Neem Oil

ABOUT

Smell

Strong, heavy odor. Not necessarily terrible (at least, compared to manuka oil), but overpowering.

Form

Both neem and coconut oil will solidify at room temperature. A much “gooier” substance than coconut oil, neem is best applied when slightly warmed for pourability. It reminds me of honey, yet slightly less sticky. Oh, if only it smelled as good as honey.

Dried sH41_L_760_427auto_inteeds can be crushed and soaked to produce oil. Bark and twigs repel pests. Twigs are chewed on for dental hygiene; roots and/or bark are available in powdered form for treating various ailments.

Shelf Life

If you want to extend the life of your neem, being an expensive oil when purchased pure, try diluting it with olive oil or another thin, inexpensive oil. Your skin will easily absorb the “thinner” oil at a faster rate, it will spread much easier, and it may reduce the overpowering scent.

TOPICAL

Skincare

The oil is moisturizing and regenerative, packed with essential fatty acids and vitamin E. Apply undiluted neem oil directly to the skin in a paste form to treat skin diseases, wounds, eczema, even cracked heels or wind-torn hands.

INTERNAL

Cooking

The fruit may be eaten fresh or cooked, and flowers can be
added to meals.

Infused in tea, neem oil can increase immunity in the body through its rich bounty of essential fatty acids.

MEDICINAL PROPERTIES

Antibacterial
AnticarcinogenicMedicinal neem fruits
Anti-clotting (Anticoagulants)
Anti-hyperglycemic
Anti-inflammatory
Anti-malarial
Anti-microbial
Anti-malarial
Anti-microbial
Antioxidant
Anti-parasitic
Anti-periodontic
Antiseptic
Antiulcer
Antiviral
De-worming
Aids in fertility
Boils
Blood detoxifier
Eye disease
Immunomodulatory
Acene
Spermicidal