Grapeseed Oil

Grapeseed oil is known for its astringent nature and ability to protect against moisture loss while strengthening cell membranes.

Smell

My favorite of the all oils – very light, pleasant, and slightly floral.

Skin

Containing 73% linoleic acid, grape seed oil’s moisture retentive properties makes this ideal for the treatment of various skin ailments, i.e., dermatitis, allergies, eczema and
sunburns. Linoleic acid’s anti-inflammatory properties also make this a good option for acne-prone skin.

Dietaryjugful-with-grape-seed-oil-on-a-wooden-table

Due to its high saturated fats content, grapeseed oil is best consumed in moderation.

Use of it as a supplement (1-3 teaspoons a day) is believed to alleviate symptoms of diabetes, arthritis, hypertension, hyperglycemia, and poor blood circulation as a result of impaired capillary valves.

Cooking

The high concentration of polyphenols give grapeseed oil a high smoke point. While an oral supplement of grapeseed oil is said to absorb better than when applied to the skin, recent studies show that grapeseed oil is not an ideal substitute for cooking oils, such as olive oil.

Caution

Because the popular extraction process for grapeseed oil involves the use of hexane, it is imperative to find oils that have been cold or expeller-pressed.

Fatty Acids Present in Grapeseed Oil

Oleic
Linoleic
Palmitic
Stearic
Myristic
Lauric

Medicinal Applications

Anti-inflammatory
Antioxidant
Antihistamine
Anti-aging
Antimicrobial
Adaptogenic